Judy Lewis Acoma Pueblo Two Children Storyteller

Item No: 9072

$ 270.00

  • Judy Lewis is a member of the Lewis sister group from Acoma Pueblo who are makers of traditional storytellers, seed pots, and plates. Lewis and her sisters learned the art of pottery-making at an early age. She was influenced in her artistic development by her sister, Marilyn Ray. Lewis' delicate and intricate storytellers are adorned with ladybugs, birds, butterflies, dogs, and cats.
    • Storyteller handmade by Judy Lewis (Acoma Pueblo)
    • Natural clay with all-natural vegetal and mineral slip
    • Storyteller measures 3” high x 3” long x 2-1/2” wide
    • Comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity

    Handcrafted works of Native American art require special care. For more information about proper care and cleaning, please read our Care Guide.

  • Judy is a member of one of the two non-related Lewis families at Acoma Pueblo: the Lucy Lewis family is the more well-known dynasty,­ while the descendants of Katherine Lewis (Marilyn Ray, Rebecca Lucario, Bernard and Sharon Lewis, Carolyn Concho, and Diane Lewis and Judy Lewis) have been responsible for some of the most innovative pottery to be produced at Acoma. Each member of her family has carved out their own particular niche: Judy's niche is one where she creates corn maidens, storytellers, and friendship bowl figures with detailed facial expressions.
  • Acoma Pueblo has a tradition of pottery that stretches back centuries. Today, it is most known for a matte polychrome style of pottery featuring orange and black designs on a white background, or black fine-line designs on a white background. This traditional style is widely sought after by Native art collectors, and in addition to its distinctive color scheme, can be identified by fluted rims, very thin walls, and complex geometric designs.

    Acoma artists are known for the fineness of their pottery painting, often incorporating hatching patterns that symbolize rain as well as rain parrot designs—an animal that in Acoma legend led people to water. Lightning, clouds, rainbow bands, and other elements of weather and nature are also popular designs. One of the most iconic and valuable pottery styles, Acoma pots represent a storied history of beauty and craftsmanship.

  • Native American and Pueblo people of the Southwest have been making clay pottery figures since ancient times. Their creation was discouraged by Christian missionaries and the form was not widely practiced in the 16th–19th centuries. Figurative pottery was revived in the 20th century and clay figurines have since become one of the most popular and widely collected Native American art forms.

    Storytellers are a type of clay figure that is unique to the Southwest. They were developed by Helen Cordero of Cochiti Pueblo in 1963, and traditionally depict a male elder telling stories to children, all with open mouths. Cordero was inspired by the traditional “Singing Mother” figure often represented in clay, and by her grandfather, a legendary Cochiti storyteller.

    In Pueblo culture, stories are passed down orally from generation to generation, and the storyteller figure represents the importance of the storytelling tradition. Today, Native artists across the Southwest create storytellers, sometimes depicting the elder and children as clowns, drummers, acrobats, cowboys, or animals, and handcrafted figurative pottery continues to be one of the most exciting, colorful, and successful pottery forms.

    Read our Native American Pottery Collector's Guide.
  • At Shumakolowa Native Arts, we guarantee that your purchase is an original and authentic work handcrafted by Native American artists as defined by the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990. We ask our artists to complete an extensive certification process, providing a CIB (Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood) card and other documentation of their Native American heritage. Our team of experts carefully inspects every product to guarantee it is handcrafted using traditional, sustainable processes, and natural materials of only the highest quality. We record the place and date of each purchase, and pride ourselves in paying a fair price that allows artists to make a living practicing their craft.

    Every work of handcrafted art comes with a Certificate of Authenticity signed by an artist or buyer. At a time when many commercially made products are being sold as handcrafted Native American art, our in-depth purchase process allows us to guarantee the authenticity of every unique piece of fine art we offer. For more than 35 years, we have made it a priority to visit artists in their studio or home to purchase their latest handcrafted pieces and learn about their work. We have developed lasting relationships with artists, as well as dealers and collectors, and we take pride in being a trusted destination for fine Native American art.

Back to Top >