Canvas of Clay: Seven Centuries of Hopi Ceramic Art

Item No: 1170

$ 39.95

  • Canvas of Clay tells the story of Hopi ceramics from the 14th century to recent times, offering a particularly close look at the art and life of the master potter Nampeyo (1860–1942). It analyzes the specific dynamics of nearly 100 jars and bowls, all richly illustrated, weaving in many insights into Hopi history, aesthetics, and symbolism. Included are original schematic drawings that will help readers understand how pottery decoration is built from ingeniously combined design elements. This book is a glorious testament to a brilliant art form and its practitioners, presented with passion, knowledge, and respect.

    • Authors: Edwin L. Wade, Allan Cooke
    • Paperback: 248 pages
    • Publisher: El Otro Lado (August 15, 2012)
    • ISBN-10: 0615639828
    • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 9.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Edwin L. Wade, PhD, is a specialist in Native culture and Southwestern art who has developed many esteemed exhibition and publication programs, including Arts of the North American Indian (Hudson Hills/Philbrook) and Historic Hopi Ceramics (Peabody, Harvard). Allan Cooke, MB.BS.MD (SYD) is a professor of medicine at the University of Kansas. He has studied and collected Hopi pottery for three decade.
  • Hopi pottery is known around the world for its fineness and elegantly painted, fluid designs. Gold-hued pots made from clays found at First Mesa are perhaps best known, though Hopi potters also create beautiful red and white vessels. The modern era of Hopi pottery begins with Nampeyo, a potter who was inspired by ancient vessels uncovered at the ancestral site of Sikyatki in the late 19th century. Her work led to a revival of Sikyatki yellowware, which features brown or red designs painted on a buff-colored background. This color comes from a gray clay that turns light yellow-gold when fired. Hopi redware features black designs on a rich red-brown background, a color that comes from a yellow clay that turns red when fired. Hopi potters use a yucca leaf brush to paint both traditional and contemporary designs onto the surface of their pots, then fire in open pits using sheep manure or cedar as fuel. Today, Hopi artists produce some of the most exquisite handcrafted pots available, and their vessels are among the most collected art forms in Southwestern Native art.
  • At Shumakolowa we are proud to sell rare and hard-to-find books that celebrate Native American and Pueblo culture, history and art. Our selection of books has been carefully curated by our team of experts to inspire and provide insight into these unique art forms.
  • At Shumakolowa Native Arts, we are proud to bring you books, music and films that celebrate and illuminate Native American artists and the original authentic art forms that are distinctive to Native Americans of the Southwest. These works are written, produced, directed or recorded by Native American authors, filmmakers and musicians or were created in consultation with Native American experts. In our unique collection of media, we bring you the finest scholarly books recognized for their nuanced exploration of Native American culture; music that comes out of Native traditions of prayer, song and dance; and films that use the voices of Native American people to examine their stories, art and history.
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