Harlan Reano Wildflower Contemporary Jar

Item No: 10951

$ 3,500.00

  • This beautifully formed contemporary one-of-a-kind vase, handcrafted by Cochiti artist Lisa Holt and Santo Domingo Pueblo artist Harlan Reano, is uniquely bold in its form and design.

    The elegant vessel features a cream base. Red, white, and black designs are hand-painted throughout, with a unique contemporary interpretation on traditional design elements.

    Holt and Reano were inspired by the purple flowers on the beeweed plant, from which their traditional black paint is derived. Meticulously constructed and painted using techniques passed down over generations, this stunning vessel captures a historic art.

    Let this lovely vase be a timeless addition to your collection of Native American pottery.
    • Handmade vase by Lisa Holt (Cochiti Pueblo) Harlan Reano (Santo Domingo)
    • Contemporary Designs
    • Natural clay with all-natural vegetal and mineral slip
    • Crafted through traditional horizontal coil method
    • Vase measurements: 10-3/4" H x 7" L x 7-3/4" W
    • Comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity

    Handcrafted works of Native American art require special care. For more information about proper care and cleaning, please read our Care Guide.

  • Lisa Holt (Cochiti) and Harlan Reano (Santo Domingo/Kewa) have been creating pottery together since 1999. Holt is of Cochiti Pueblo heritage on her mother’s side, and comes from an illustrious family of artists, including her uncle, Virgil Ortiz. She learned the art of pottery from her mother, Inez Ortiz, and her grandmother, well-known Cochiti potter Seferina Ortiz. Holt uses clay from Cochiti Pueblo to sculpt pottery that is then painted by Reano.

    Reano is Santo Domingo/Kewa on his mother’s side, and his painted designs are sometimes inspired by older Santo Domingo pottery. The two artists complete their collaborations by firing the pots together.

    When they first began collaborating nearly two decades ago, the pair initially specialized in large ollas and figurative pottery inspired by the old Cochiti tradition of human and animal forms, including frogs and lizards. More recently they have expanded into pots, jars, and figures that are rooted in tradition but have a more contemporary, sometimes edgy, feel to them.

  • Cochiti Pueblo has been making sophisticated clay pottery and figurines for hundreds of years. It may be best-known as the birthplace of the Storyteller figure, one of the most widely collected and recognized Pueblo art forms.

    Storytellers were developed by Cochiti Pueblo potter Helen Cordero in 1963, and traditionally depict a male elder telling stories to children, all with open mouths. Cordero was inspired by the traditional “Singing Mother” figure often represented in clay, and by her grandfather, a legendary Cochiti storyteller.

    In Pueblo culture, stories are passed down orally from generation to generation, and the Storyteller figure represents the importance of the storytelling tradition. Today, Cochiti potters make traditional Storytellers as well as more contemporary figurines that depict non-traditional subjects such as animals, and are often whimsical or humorous in style.

    Cochiti’s traditional pottery style is a black, red, and buff polychrome with the base and interior of the vessel painted red. Traditional designs include birds, animals, rain, clouds, flowers, lightning, and other motifs drawn from nature. Today, pottery-making remains an extremely strong and vibrant art form in Cochiti Pueblo, with many artists producing work of incredibly high quality in both traditional and contemporary styles.

  • The most celebrated and recognized art form of the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico is pottery. Pueblo pottery is known around the world for its remarkable beauty and craftsmanship. It has been made in much the same way for over a thousand years, with every step of creation completed by hand.

    Pueblo potters do not use a wheel, but construct pots using the traditional horizontal coil method, or freely forming the shape. After the pot is formed, the artist polishes the piece with a natural polishing stone, such as a river stone, then paints it with a vegetal, mineral, or commercial slip. Finally, the pot is fired in an outdoor fire or kiln using manure or wood as fuel.

    Santa Clara, San Ildefonso, Jemez, and Acoma Pueblos have distinctive pottery styles that are especially prized by collectors, but accomplished potters are working in all Pueblos.

    Today, Pueblo pottery is an exciting and dynamic form, with many artists pairing traditional techniques with innovative and stylized designs. Those potters who continue to create pots using traditional methods possess an extraordinary level of skill, and their pots are highly valuable works of fine art that will be enjoyed for generations to come.

    Read our Native American Pottery Collector's Guide.
    • Handmade vase by Lisa Holt (Cochiti Pueblo) Harlan Reano (Santo Domingo)
    • Contemporary Designs
    • Natural clay with all-natural vegetal and mineral slip
    • Crafted through traditional horizontal coil method
    • Vase measurements: 10-3/4" H x 7" L x 7-3/4" W
    • Comes with a signed Certificate of Authenticity

    Handcrafted works of Native American art require special care. For more information about proper care and cleaning, please read our Care Guide.

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