American Indian Jewelry I: 1,200 Artist Biographies

Item No: 1756

$ 65.00

  • This volume profiles over 1,200 Indian jewelers from all tribes over the past two centuries. The text is illustrated with over 2,000 photographs. This book was created with the cooperation of Indian artists. Through artist surveys, archival research and personal interviews, information was collected in 25 categories: including the artist's tribe, clan, active years, type of jewelry, lifespan, family relationships, education, teachers, students, awards, exhibitions, collections, forms, techniques, materials, favorite designs, and publications. From the American Indian Arts Series, this book is an essential resource for Native American jewelry collectors.

    • Author: Gregory Schaaf
    • Hardcover; 342 pages
    • Publisher: Ciac Pr; First Edition (January 1, 2003)
    • ISBN-10: 0966694872
    • Product Dimensions: 11.3” x 8.6” x 1.2”
  • Dr. Gregory Schaaf is the Director of the Center for Indigenous Arts & Cultures in Santa Fe. He earned his doctorate in American Indian History and a degree in Art History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. During his distinguished teaching career, he became an Associate Professor and Coordinator of Native American Studies Programs. As a recognized scholar, he addressed the United Nations and testified before the United States Senate on Indian Affairs. He is the author of the American Indian Art Series; Wampum Belts & Peace Trees; Franklin, Jefferson, & Madison: On Religion & the State; The U.S. Constitution and the Great Law of Peace.
  • Jewelry has been made and worn in the Southwest since prehistoric times. For thousands of years Native Southwestern people have made mosaic inlay and beads of turquoise, shell, bone or stone. Metal arrived with the Spanish. Native Americans acquired metal ornaments through trade, but it was not until the middle of the 19th century that Navajo and Zuni artisans learned the craft from Mexican blacksmiths and silversmiths. Their early silver jewelry creations were plain, with simple engraved, stamped or punched designs. Turquoise was first used in silver around 1880. By the turn of the century, silversmithing was widespread across the Southwest and Native artists were making more sophisticated pieces like concho belts and squash blossom and naja necklaces. The Navajo soon became known for their use of silver, emphasizing silver-heavy designs with only a few gemstones, while the Zuni focused on stone work, featuring finely cut clusters of gems in complex patterns. The Hopi and Pueblo tribes also developed distinctive jewelry styles in the early 1900s. Today, Native American artists draw upon both traditional and contemporary influences, and their shell, gemstone and silver jewelry is prized and collected by people around the world.
  • At Shumakolowa we are proud to sell rare and hard-to-find books that celebrate Native American and Pueblo culture, history and art. Our selection of books has been carefully curated by our team of experts to inspire and provide insight into these unique art forms.
  • At Shumakolowa Native Arts, we are proud to bring you books, music and films that celebrate and illuminate Native American artists and the original authentic art forms that are distinctive to Native Americans of the Southwest. These works are written, produced, directed or recorded by Native American authors, filmmakers and musicians or were created in consultation with Native American experts. In our unique collection of media, we bring you the finest scholarly books recognized for their nuanced exploration of Native American culture; music that comes out of Native traditions of prayer, song and dance; and films that use the voices of Native American people to examine their stories, art and history.
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